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Improving Student Outcomes

Over the past six years in Houston ISD, 106 of the district’s 281 schools have received a failing grade at least once. In 2018 alone, more than 44,000 students attended an HISD school that received a D or an F rating — which is to say, one out of every five of the district’s students. Each one is a child who is being failed by a system that is supposed to build them up and create opportunity. In the most recent state A-F Accountability ratings released by the Texas Education Agency on August 15, 2019, 21 HISD schools received an F rating. One of the failing campuses, Wheatley High School, has received a failing rating for seven years in a row and has performed well below state averages on nearly every metric.

For the sake of our students’ future, we must all do better and that starts with what we expect of our leaders of the district. A culture of dysfunction, perpetuated through self-serving behavior and poor decisions by the board of trustees, has gone on too long. This dysfunction has created uncertainty and roadblocks for everyone in the district — the administration, principals, teachers, parents and most important, our children. This level of failure is unacceptable and must be addressed. 
 

Prioritize All Houston Students

  • The Houston ISD school board’s long-term failure to consistently support all of our schools and create opportunity for all of our children warrants new leadership. HISD needs a fresh start.

  • The Greater Houston Partnership insists on a local board of managers composed of a diverse group of Houstonians who will prioritize our children and create sustainable conditions where clear-minded decisions can be made. 

  • This is a time for the Houston community to come together. This is an opportunity to create a student-centered culture of governance and lift the entire system.
     

Principles for Improving Student Outcomes

The Greater Houston Partnership has laid out five principles we believe members of a local board of managers must embrace.

As we navigate a period of uncertainty in Houston ISD, the Partnership will remain focused on these guiding principles for how we will do better for our students. Resetting the culture requires district leaders to be held accountable for their failures. It also requires a plan for a thoughtful transition that returns control back to the electorate, but with a stronger culture of governance established within the district that prioritizes our children.

Prioritize students by establishing a positive culture of student-focused governance and accountability within the board and administration.
Focus on addressing the needs of the lowest-performing campuses while continuing to grow excellence of successful campuses.
Improve student outcomes by establishing campus-level autonomy and accountability to empower principals and teachers to implement targeted solutions.
Identify and implement programming that has led to high student achievement and supports teachers.
Elevate all students, teachers, and campus faculty by engaging parents and community members to become more involved in public education from the boardroom to the classroom.

Partnership Op-Ed

Read the Partnership Op-ed: HISD Students Deserve a New Board.

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Texas Education Commissioner Morath - Keynote Address

Outlook on student outcomes at inaugural State of Education.

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Texas School Accountability Ratings

View the A-F ratings for Texas ISDs and specific schools.

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