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Employer Insights Wanted: Survey to Identify Trends in Employer-Provided Training

Published Mar 09, 2021 by Susan Moore

People taking notes in a meeting or training course

How have the COVID-19 public health crisis and economic downturn affected current training programs employers offer? And how might they influence programs in the future? 

This month, New America’s Center on Education and Labor and Partnership to Advance Youth Apprenticeship (PAYA), in collaboration with ETH Zurich, are surveying employers to understand trends in employer-provided training (including internships, on-the-job- training, apprenticeships and professional development). The 10- to 15-minute survey asks employers a variety of short questions pertaining to:

  • The scope of and motivations for sponsoring employer-provided training;
  • Profiles of training participant;
  • Barriers to offering or expanding training; and,
  • Any effects the COVID-19 public health crisis may have had on training programs.

The 2021 Employer Training Survey will help Washington D.C.-based action-tank New America identify the scope of and national trends in employer-provided training before and during the COVID-19 public health crisis. Results will provide policymakers and workforce development practitioners with information around necessary investments and supports for different types of work-based learning programs.

With more than 160,000 establishments – large and small – across 20 industries in 2019, greater Houston’s employers can add considerable depth into the survey’s findings and national trends. Public, private and nonprofit employers of any size are encouraged to participate, regardless of whether they currently offer training. Employers are asked to submit one response only (multi-site employers may submit one survey for each of their locations).

The survey is live and can be accessed here. It will remain open through March 31, 2021. 

Learn more about New America’s Center on Education and Labor and Partnership to Advance Youth Apprenticeships. Survey FAQs may be seen here.

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