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Manufacturing Employment
213,100+

Houston has one of the largest manufacturing workforces in the country

UpSkill Houston Fuels a Stronger Economy with Greater Opportunity

Employers across Greater Houston are looking to hire qualified residents for good-paying careers that require skills beyond high school, but less than a four-year college degree. Nearly 1 million such positions exist, and the number is projected to grow. Yet employers face difficulties finding workers to fill these occupations. 

Through research, analysis, and engagement with critical stakeholders, UpSkill Houston understands the barriers to attracting, training, and placing qualified workers in these careers. UpSkill Houston brings stakeholders together and helps them:

UpSkill Houston challenges employers, educators, community-based leaders, and public officials to join us in accelerated, collective action to grow the skilled workforce Houston needs to compete in the global, 21st century economy and create opportunity for all Houstonians. 

UpSkill Houston has emerged as a leader for bold change by orchestrating the direct impact necessary to create a pipeline of skilled workers for the region’s employers and better pathways to prosperity for the region’s residents. Our progress, approach, and framework have served as the inspiration or model for workforce development initiatives in Texas and across the country. Learn more here. 

 

Factors Affecting the Growth of a Skilled Workforce

Employers across Greater Houston are looking to hire qualified area residents for good paying, rewarding careers that require skills beyond high school, but less than a four-year college degree. Of the more than 3.1 million workers in Greater Houston, more than 920,000 or 30 percent are employed in occupations meeting these criteria. The region’s recent overall rapid job growth included meaningful growth in these occupations, and this trend is expected to continue over the next five years.

Yet employers are facing difficulties finding workers with the skills and education to fill these positions. There is a strong push for students to pursue four-year college degrees. Certain industries struggle with outdated perceptions about their work. Effective career guidance for these careers is lacking. Also, current workers who are unemployed or under-employed face multiple challenges as they seek to upskill and reskill into these occupations.

Further, Houston’s economy and industries are being reshaped by technology and other global forces at a more rapid pace than ever before, impacting talent needs. As technology affects all jobs — creating new ones, augmenting others, and automating some — digital skills will increasingly be a requirement in all occupations. In addition, employers are placing a premium on soft and noncognitive skills.

Upcoming Event

UpSkill Houston Facilitates Workforce Conversations

UpSkill Houston launched its UpSkill Works Forum Series to foster workforce development discussions and actions across greater Houston’s employer, education and non-profit communities by presenting conversations with regional business, education and community leaders, policy makers and high-profile thought leaders on the key workforce issues the greater Houston region confronts. The series supports and advances the initiative’s work to help employers identify the key skills they need for workers to be successful, provide relevant information about careers and pathways, and drive effective career guidance.

UpSkill Houston Unites Partners to Overcome Barriers

The Greater Houston Partnership believes that broad and meaningful employer leadership is necessary to bridge the divide between employers’ demands and workforce needs. The Partnership committed to address the region’s skills gap by establishing the UpSkill Houston initiative to help employers find the right talent when and where they are needed and to help individuals gain the right skills and credentials to access the good jobs employers offer. 

Since 2014, UpSkill Houston has mobilized leaders from more than 200 prominent businesses, K-12 districts, community colleges, community-based organizations, and public agencies to work collectively to understand — and overcome — the barriers to attracting, training, placing, and growing qualified workers in good careers that are vital to the region’s global competitiveness.

Already UpSkill Houston and its partners have demonstrated how, working collectively, they can prepare incoming workers for good careers in vital industries, reskill incumbent workers for changing occupations, create shared prosperity for area families, and enable high-demand industries to thrive. 

Examples of efforts by UpSkill Houston and it partners to address talent pipeline challenges, include: 

ATTRACT: Working initially with partners in the construction, health science, petrochemical, and transportation industries, UpSkill Houston has created a series of videos and resources that showcase for students, parents, and workers seeking new opportunities a variety of good careers that don’t require a four-year college degree. The videos are available at UpSkillMyLife.org. 

TRAIN: MAREK recently partnered with Houston Independent School District and Houston Community College (HCC) to enable high school students to earn industry-recognized Level 1 certificates from HCC and drywall credentials through work experience at MAREK by the time they graduate with their high school diplomas. MAREK’s pre-apprenticeship program is patterned after a similar program developed by TRIO Electric with HCC and Spring Branch Independent School District. 

PLACE:  Since its founding in 2014, NextOp has placed approximately 2,100 “middle-enlisted” veterans — most without a four-year college degree — in meaningful careers, by connecting employers’ need for job-ready candidates with service members’ ability to succeed at a different mission, with different resources. NextOp helps employers recognize veterans’ talents and notice them in a candidate pool, while coaching veterans to describe their skills in a way employers value. 
 

 

UpSkill Houston and its partners have built a strong foundation, yet there is more work to be done. We need employers to articulate, with a collective voice, the skills and competencies they need in their workers. We need educational partners to adapt and improve curricula and prepare students for the good jobs that don’t require four years of college. We need community-based organizations to continuously improve their programs that prepare their clients for these good jobs.
Through UpSkill Houston programs, regional leaders share ideas with national thought leaders, such as Joseph B. Fuller, Harvard Business School professor and co-director of the school’s Managing the Future of Work project.

“We all go to lots of meetings where we talk about what needs to be fixed but rarely do individuals own the work to make something happen. It’s very impressive how UpSkill Houston has been able to bring everyone together to accomplish common goals.”


Linda Aldred
Texas Children’s Hospital

“The minute I heard there was an opportunity to leverage what the Greater Houston Partnership was doing to make our industry better and our company better, joining UpSkill Houston was a no-brainer.”


Daniel M. Gilbane
Gilbane Building Co.

“I am sitting in Alief Independent School District watching my students' lives change because of efforts like this.”


HD Chambers
Alief Independent School District

“UpSkill Houston helped us build relationships across sectors and made sure we were all talking about the same issues.”


Brenda Hellyer
San Jacinto Community College

Continued National Acclaim for UpSkill Houston

UpSkill Houston has been cited as an exemplar by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation's Talent Pipeline Management Initiative, the Communities that Work Partnership of the U.S. Department of Commerce and the Aspen Institute, the Global Cities Initiative of the Brookings Institution and JP Morgan Chase, and United Way Worldwide. UpSkill Houston has hosted business and community leaders from Phoenix; Detroit; Tampa Bay, Fla.; and Buffalo-Niagara, NY to learn about our employer-led approach. Our work has been featured in The Houston ChronicleHouston Business JournalForbesThe Hill, and U.S. News & World Report. Our partners have received extensive coverage for their workforce development and educational advancement efforts from local and national press.

Recent News

Education

Higher Education Commissioner: Urgent Action Needed to Address Texas Skills Needs

6/14/22
The shift toward an innovation-based, technology-enabled economy has rapidly changed the skills and credentials needed by Texans in the workforce. Many individuals have struggled to keep pace. A new strategic plan outlines how Texas can prepare students and workers for the shift taking place in the state and regional economies – but it will take the combined efforts of employers and educators to focus resources and accelerate the pace of innovation around workforce education. The state’s community colleges have the scale and infrastructure for addressing the skills challenges Texas employers and residents face.  This is according to Dr. Harrison Keller, commissioner of higher education with the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB), which released its new Building a Talent Strong Texas plan earlier this year. Keller’s comments came during an UpSkill Works forum hosted by the Partnership and its UpSkill Houston initiative held in early June. Community colleges have the potential to take on large-scale challenges such as the one at hand, but they weren’t designed to meet the urgent needs of the changing economy. The window of opportunity to re-tool and re-envision the types of credentials offered through higher education and the way institutions are organized and engage employers and students is open now, he said. “This is a time when we need to clear away the regulatory brush. We need to get behind the innovators and we need to commit ourselves to impacting at scale to serve many more people than we ever have served before, to educate many more people to higher standards with higher credentials than we ever have successfully achieved before. That’s what’s going to ensure our competitiveness in the long-term,” he said. By 2030, more than 60 percent of jobs in the state’s economy are going to require education and skills beyond high school, according to Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. However, the number of Texans with that education has not been keeping pace. According to current data roughly one in four Houston Metro Area adults are high school graduates (or equivalent) but have not attended college.  Over the last several years, THECB engaged with hundreds of key employers, community leaders, K-12 education leaders, and higher education leaders across Texas in order to learn how best to hedge against the growing disconnect between workforce needs and educational attainment. The result is a strategic, market-driven plan that updates and raises the bar of the state’s 60x30 Texas plan to educate, graduate, and better prepare a broader scope of students and workers to meet the new economy’s current and projected workforce and skill-based demands. “The Talent Strong Texas plan give us a much clearer vision that’s aligned with what we heard from our employers, what we heard from Texans what they need from our colleges and universities,” Keller said. “Part of what’s ambitious about the Texas plan that you don’t see in any other state right now is this idea that we need a plan that’s market driven.” Through the new plan, the state: Expands its age target from learners and workers (ages 25 to 34 years old) to include all working-age Texans (ages 25 to 64 years old); Sets a target for 95 percent of students to graduate with no undergraduate or manageable levels of debt; and  Places emphasis on educational attainment beyond traditional degrees – associate degrees, bachelor’s degrees, and master’s degrees – to also include short-term workforce credentials, micro-credentials, and other workforce-aligned, “credentials of value.” “In this context what we mean [is] of value to individuals if we look at the typical earnings that are associated with those credentials in our Texas labor market, even accounting for the cost of earning those credentials,” Keller said. These credentials must have a currency, too, in that an employer would recognize that the holder possessed specific sets of skills. In this way, they would translate into value for both the holder and an employer. “We would say these credentials are ‘of value’ because Texas employers value them,” he said. Education institutions across the state will need to leverage data around student progression and industry wages to improve this alignment between educational and workforce needs, he said. In the plan, the state also sets forth new goals around research, development, and innovation to keep the state competitive and to renew its commitment to equity. Ninety-five percent of the state’s population growth in the last decade was seen in communities of color, yet statewide, Black and Hispanic adults lag far behind white adults in educational attainment. Texas cannot reach its goals if they are not advanced equitably to make sure all residents have the opportunity to participate in, contribute to, and benefit from the state’s economy, he said. In his remarks, Keller noted the emergence of non-credit workforce programs that are stackable with for-credit and other credentialing programs and acknowledged the importance of education and employers working together to align convertible programs and credentials.  “That’s really hard work to do well, and it requires close partnership with the employers to understand the career trajectories, to understand with the skills look like. But the payoff for the employers, the payoff for students is really transformative,” Keller said. Work-based learning, apprenticeship programs, and internships are among the best and most cost-effective ways to ensure this alignment, he said, adding that these opportunities need not be limited to large employers. Effective work-based learning and internship programs require strong engagement and partnership with employers to ensure employers, students, and educational institutions achieve mutual outcomes.  Keller also touched on the state’s continuing work to improve student advising, the value of dual credit and dual-enrollment programs, and the need to engage students at a younger age to help them advance through their high school requirements and courses that will transfer into any college or university. Community colleges are in many ways the “safety net” of American higher education, offering a breadth of options for adult learners from English language proficiency to high school completion and equivalency programs, to transfer and continuing education, and workforce programs, he said. Nearly 250,000 Texans have left the educational pipeline either at a K-12 or a higher education level since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Keller believes the vast majority have taken jobs to contribute to the household income – likely low-wage and low-mobility jobs – and will need to turn to community colleges for upskilling support over the next several years. There is urgency for action and to focus on education resources and policy to meet these challenges head-on, particularly for community colleges. “That’s the thing that I’m most worried about – that we won’t work like we’re running out of time – because we are,” Keller said. Related: Rebooting Community Colleges to Get Americans Back to Work Post-Secondary Skills and Education Are Essential for Texans and for Texas The Partnership’s UpSkill Houston initiative works to strengthen the talent pipeline employers need to grow their businesses and to help all Houstonians build relevant skills and connect to good careers that increase their economic opportunity and mobility. Learn more. The UpSkill Houston initiative’s UpSkill Works Forum Series presents conversations with regional business, education and community leaders, policy makers and high-profile thought leaders on the key workforce issues the greater Houston region confronts. See previous forums here.
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Economic Development

Employers Tap First-Gen Students as 'Rising Stars' Through University of St. Thomas Internship Program

6/13/22
In his scrubs, sneakers and surgical mask, Peter Nguyen looks a lot like other staff of the Houston Methodist Research Institute for Technology, Innovation & Education (MITIE℠), in the Texas Medical Center, dedicated to the use of simulation in education, training and research for health care related procedures and technologies. Nguyen has helped set up labs for procedures and sterilized equipment, has practiced suturing and used MITIE℠’s da Vinci surgical system robotic arm, and has shadowed a nuclear pharmacist and participated in trials of cutting-edge technology. Nguyen is a 19-year-old second-year nursing student at the University of St. Thomas working at MITIE℠ through the school’s Rising Stars Internship Program. “We don’t look at him as a student worker – he’s a worker here,” said Homer Quintana, program project manager for the Center for Rapid Device Translation at Houston Methodist, and Nguyen’s supervisor. “On my first day, I got to use VR,” Nguyen said. “With me being a nursing major and getting to learn sutures – it’s really awesome. I’m 19 years old and I get to do all these things.” The University of St. Thomas’ Rising Stars Internship program helps first-generation college students pursue higher education while gaining relevant work experience related to their college majors. Participating students receive a minimum of $20,000 toward their total tuition costs through scholarships, financial aid, and an $8,000 annual payment from partner employers. This means they can gain a life-changing college education for a minimal out-of-pocket cost. In exchange, students spend eight to 10 hours each week working with their partner employers. First-generation college students are more likely to face greater hurdles in finding good employment than classmates with better career guidance and professional connections, according to the Pew Research Center. And, one year after graduation, they are more likely to be underemployed when compared with peer graduates whose parents competed college, data from the Center for First-generation Student Success show. The Rising Stars program launched in 2019 with five students and four corporate partners. By the 2022 fall semester, it will have grown to about 185 students—many from local districts and high schools including Fort Bend ISD, Houston ISD and Klein ISD, Cristo Rey Jesuit College Preparatory School, KIPP Texas—Houston and YES Prep—and its first class of seniors will graduate next year. Its corporate and nonprofit partners now number around 50, spread across the banking, energy, and medical industries, among others. In the fall of 2020, program students represented about 10 percent of the freshman class with roughly one quarter of the students on the school’s Dean’s List. "At the heart of UST is the imperative to serve, especially those with limited access to educational excellence," said Dr. Richard Ludwick, president of UST. "With this in mind, we launched the Rising Stars Internship Program to propel scholarship-dependent students into the professional environment as future contenders for top positions." The University takes particular care to match interns with employers based on the students’ areas of study so that they may gain relevant work experience and understand the intricacies and opportunities within a specific industry. The Rising Stars program also provides its employer partners with motivated student workers, who could potentially become full-time employees. Quintana has created opportunities to help expose Nguyen to the different perspectives and diverse settings within a research clinic. Quintana says the Texas Medical Center needs clinical research nurses and organized for Nguyen to “job shadow” one, which Nguyen says helped him recognize his interests. Nguyen says his experience at MITIE℠ has shown him practical applications and given him a deeper understanding of concepts and anatomy that he’s learned about in school. He became interested in medical equipment and instruments by preparing labs for, and cleaning up after, procedures. “It might seem like an intern task, but I get to learn about instruments while putting them away,” he said. Nguyen is currently leaning toward becoming an operating room nurse or a surgical nurse practitioner but is excited to experience more nursing avenues. Practical, career-connected work is only part of the internship experience. Mentoring is the other. Taking on an intern and being a mentor is “one of the most meaningful things you can do with your life,” said Schuyler Tilney, chairman of energy services and equipment for Tudor, Pickering, Holt & Co., and host of a Rising Stars intern. Tilney has, over the course of several years, mentored numerous high school and first-generation college student interns and has taken the time to connect his current and former interns with one another; they have begun building supportive, family-like relationships with each other, he said. He would urge employers to take the time to get involved in the lives of their interns, or to make sure someone on the team does. Tilney spent the 2020-2021 school year meeting one-on-one with his Rising Stars intern and teaching her about the oil and gas business and corporate finance and investment banking, which tied into her accounting coursework. Tilney turned his attention this school year toward teaching her about the business world and helping her build life skills and career skills including how to write a good resume and search for jobs online. Matt Braly, regional president and executive vice president of Third Coast Bank in Houston, and his team have helped his Rising Stars intern understand the banking world along with the complexities of personal finance and real estate investment from the banking perspective with real-life applications. Braly has also spoken with his intern, a freshman, about life, the college experience and its challenges – including how they fit together. For a first-generation college student without family to offer advice, an internship provides first-hand understanding of the importance of college education and life success. Braly has also recognized a positive change in the student’s attitude toward attending college, in general. Rising Stars interns, he said, are grateful, and eager to learn. Nguyen agrees. “It’s wonderful that we’re all growing and part of this adult experience while in school. People who don’t have the Rising Stars program don’t have these types of internship experiences. We’re lucky to have these types of opportunities and to work for our tuition as well,” he said. To Quintana, internships provide employers with young workers who can help with tasks while giving seasoned employees an opportunity to mentor and get a new generation excited about their businesses and industries. Interns such as Nguyen are viewed as potential hires upon their graduation, he said, as they’ve had a chance to learn a business and a company’s identity and values. “I want to make sure Peter understands the worth of what he’s doing, and of himself,” Quintana said. “We have a vested interest in him succeeding.”   Related: Professional Networking Platform Gives First-Gen College Students ‘Career Spring’ The Partnership’s UpSkill Houston initiative works to strengthen the talent pipeline employers need to grow their businesses and to help all Houstonians build relevant skills and connect to good careers that increase their economic opportunity and mobility. Learn more.
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Employment

Greater Houston Partnership and Opportunity@Work Join Forces to Accelerate Pathways for Workers Skilled Through Alternative Routes (STARs)

6/3/22
HOUSTON (June 3, 2022) — As the country charts a path to a more inclusive economic recovery, many creative and forward-thinking ideas to build a stronger and more equitable labor market are emerging at the state and local levels. The governor of Maryland recently announced that thousands of state jobs will no longer require college degrees. The Bay Area Opportunity Onramps collaborative, and the community reskilling partnerships undertaken in cities like Buffalo and Louisville, are similar regional efforts focused on helping workers access higher-wage jobs. What these initiatives have in common is their aim to accelerate economic opportunity for workers who are Skilled Through Alternative Routes (STARs) rather than through a bachelor’s degree.  This week, we’re excited to share that Houston is taking action to support screening in, hiring, training, and supporting STARs in ways that build on the city’s long track record of elevating and expanding pathways to economic mobility. Houston has a well-deserved reputation as an engine of workforce innovation. The Greater Houston Partnership (the “Partnership”) has become a catalyst for economic growth and a leader in workforce development for the 12-county Houston region. The Partnership’s UpSkill Houston and Houston Back on Track initiatives are jobs-first and employer-led efforts that recruit aspiring workers and connect them to training and wraparound supports that enable them to pursue occupations in high-growth fields like energy, manufacturing, and life sciences. These kinds of initiatives have earned national recognition as models of the sort of collaborative, community-driven work that can transform regional economies and provide economic mobility. That transformative power is bolstered by the work of employers in the industries that drive and support the growth of Greater Houston’s regional economy. Thanks in large part to the efforts of Mayor Turner’s administration to attract businesses and expand the region’s economy, Houston saw record job growth over the past year. Importantly, many of the area’s largest employers are in industries with an abundance of what we call Gateway Jobs: roles that don’t require a bachelor’s degree but that open the door to higher-paying jobs that build on those same skill sets. Recent workforce investments from Boeing and Houston’s energy employers preparing for the transition to a low-carbon future, including its emergence as an innovation hub of green energy, create a strong foundation for the growing number of jobs where STARs could excel. Continued innovation in upskilling talent will ensure that the city is positioned to continue in its role as an exemplar of adaptability and momentum in a changing world of work.  Houston is home to a large and growing population of STARs, many of whom already have the skills to succeed in the region’s fastest-growing industries. Today, some 60 percent of greater Houston’s adult population are STARs who can close talent gaps for employers who are savvy enough to proactively seek out those workers, rather than screening them out with unnecessary degree requirements. The strength of Houston’s STARs also provide an opportunity for policy and community leaders seeking to provide new paths to economic growth and opportunity in the area.  As in so many regions around the country, the imperative to support STARs is also one of equity: while one-third of adults over age 25 in Houston have earned a bachelor’s degree or higher, that ratio is much lower for Hispanic and Black workers. As such, encouraging employers to adapt their talent acquisition strategies and screen in STARs will have a disproportionate and positive impact on the job prospects of Black and Hispanic workers throughout the region — and will also better enable Houston employers to boost diversity and inclusion in their workforces.  This new initiative will build on Houston’s existing foundation by enabling workers and employers throughout the region to access Stellarworx, the talent matching platform focused specifically on helping employers hire STARs. Modeled on similar partnerships in the Bay Area and the Youngstown, Ohio, metropolitan area, Opportunity@Work and the Greater Houston Partnership’s UpSkill Houston are joining forces with business leaders and community-based talent developers in Houston to create an employer-led, one-stop shop that brings together aspiring workers, education and training providers, and employers themselves. Our goal is to accelerate the ongoing work of organizations in the region by creating a centralized resource focused specifically on developing and supporting diverse workers without bachelor’s degrees. In the weeks to come, we will be engaging employers, talent developers, and community partners across greater Houston to explore how they can get involved, whether by joining Stellarworx or helping to elevate this initiative with partners throughout the region. Together, we can take the steps toward building a labor market that works for STARs in Houston — and, in so doing, set an example for other cities around the country that are working to build a stronger, more inclusive, and more equitable labor market.   Peter Beard is the senior vice president of Regional Workforce Development at Greater Houston Partnership. Bridgette Gray is the chief customer officer at Opportunity@Work.
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Executive Committee
Sector Leadership
UpSkill Houston Team

UpSkillHouston.org

Career information for job seekers, educators and partners.

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UpSkillMyLife.org

Video series introducing careers and the pathways to entry.

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PetrochemWorks.com

Tool to match skills with careers in the petrochemical manufacturing industry

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Major Funding Partners

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Additional Resources

Find reports and other information and resources tied to UpSkill Houston. 

This report highlights the disruption that greater automation and increased requirements for digital skills is causing for regional workers and the importance of helping workers build digital skills and identify career progressions for occupations that can lead to economic opportunity.

A recent labor market report underscores the long-term and critical role of middle-skill occupations in positioning the Houston region to be competitive in the 21st century and creating economic opportunity for its residents.

This series presents conversations with business and community leaders, policy makers, and leading thinkers on the key workforce issues confronting the Greater Houston region.

Business, education, and community organization leaders highlight how participating in the Greater Houston Partnership's UpSkill Houston initiative has strengthened workforce development efforts through collaborative action.

This labor market study highlights the prevalence and growth of middle-skill jobs within Greater Houston’s economy and analyzes how automation and increased digital skills are transforming the nature of work.

This video from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation shows how UpSkill is leading the way to close the skills gap using lessons learned in supply chain management.

UpSkill Houston's "My Life As" campaign provides stories of workers in high demand, growth opportunity careers.

By contributing to the Employer Champion Campaign, companies are setting Houston on a better path and improving the skilled workforce and economy for generations to come.

A comprehensive look at the work and results of UpSkill Houston.

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View Past Editions of the UpSkill Update Newsletter

JUN
2022
Addressing Texas Skills Needs & Tapping into Workforce STARs
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MAY
2022
Higher Education & Workforce Recovery
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APR
2022
Community Colleges & Sourcing Skilled Talent
View
MAR
2022
Internships, Career Exploration & Workforce STARs
View
JAN
2022
Expanding Equitable Career Opportunities
View
DEC
2021
2022 Employment Forecast, Building Talent & Reviewing Higher Ed Funding
View
OCT
2021
Labor Market Update; Skilling Opportunities for Veterans, Young Adults & More
View
SEP
2021
Getting Houston Back on Track
View
AUG
2021
Understanding & tapping into today's talent and tomorrow's
View
JUL
2021
Houston a leader in innovative recovery initiatives
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JUN
2021
Apprenticeships and developing the future workforce to aid recovery
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MAY
2021
How employers will view talent and skills in post-pandemic economy; Plus UpSkill Works Forum returns
View
APR
2021
Employment recovery; Secrets to Starting your career right revealed
View
MAR
2021
Unemployment revisited; Legislative update; Employer-education partnerships
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FEB
2021
Texas plans recovery efforts, builds workforce strategies
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JAN
2021
Economic recovery underscores urgency in upskilling
View
NOV
2020
Spotlight on higher ed, adult learners
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OCT
2020
Re-imagining career-relevant education; Student awareness of good careers
View
SEP
2020
COVID-19 & innovation in career exploration; Talent Finance initiative
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AUG
2020
New "My Life As..." career stories; Houston expands digital alliance; talent finance discussions
View
JUL
2020
Navigating the changing nature of work; Reskilling through higher ed
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JUN
2020
COVID-19 impact on Houston’s workforce; HCC unveils job-connected training portal
View
MAY
2020
COVID-19 presents short-term problems, long-term opportunities; New funding for workforce development announced
View
APR
2020
UpSkill Houston partners on animated soft skill series
View
MAR
2020
COVID-19 and workforce disruption
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FEB
2020
Career coaching outcomes examined; Transportation leaders eye education programs
View
JAN
2020
Putting talent first and making Houston a great global city; Connecting with jobseekers
View
DEC
2019
UpSkill Houston drives action, looks ahead to the future
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NOV
2019
UpSkill benefits from elite fellowship program
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OCT
2019
Embracing change to create a competitive edge; Leadership reviews new 5-year plan
View