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Harris County Issues Mandatory 'Stay Home-Work Safe' Order

Published Mar 24, 2020 by A.J. Mistretta

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Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo, in coordination with Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, issued a mandatory “Stay Home-Work Safe” Order, effective at 11:59 pm March 24, to preserve public health and safety in Harris County in the face of the coronavirus COVID-19. The order was originally in effect through April 3 and was later extended to April 30. Click here to read the official order. 

The Partnership has been in regular communication with the Judge’s and Mayor's offices to ensure that employers in our critical industries were considered, while balancing the extraordinary need for citizens to avoid public interaction.

Exempted Sectors

The list of industries and related jobs that are exempted are outlined in the order itself. Companies in all other industries not outlined in the order must cease on-site operations by 11:59 pm on March 24. 

Businesses in industries not exempted by the order may apply to the County for an waiver. Exemption requests must provide evidence that the business is essential to promoting the general welfare of the residents of Harris County. The County is currently developing an application process which will be made available at ReadyHarris.org.  

Work Safe

The Judge and Mayor both made references to “Work Safe” practices for those essential businesses still operating. The Partnership has created a series of 10 principles to help companies ensure the health and safety of their employees. 

These are certainly extraordinary days, and we recognize the severe impact this order and the virus that necessitated it are having, and will continue to have, on our community. The Partnership is committed to keeping you informed as this situation progresses and we are developing programming and content to help businesses make smart decisions.

Visit the Partnership's COVID-19 Resource page for updates, guidance for employers and more information. And sign up for daily email alerts from the Partnership as the situation develops. 

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