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Hewlett Packard Enterprise Relocating Global HQ to Houston

Published Dec 01, 2020 by Clint Pasche

HPE Houston campus.jpg

New HPE Houston campus opening in 2022

Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) announced the company will relocate its global headquarters to the Houston region from San Jose, California. The headquarters will be located at the company’s new state-of-the-art Springwoods Village campus slated to open in early 2022. 

HPE's expansion in and headquarters relocation to the Houston area holds the potential to add hundreds of jobs to its already robust presence in the coming years. Read the official release from Texas Governor Greg Abbott’s office.

HPE cited Houston’s diverse talent base and low cost of doing business as key factors driving the move to the digital tech hub and global headquarters city. The company already has a large footprint in the Houston region, with more than 2,600 employees working in the area. The new HPE campus, being built in the 60-acre Springwoods Village development, will consist of two five-story buildings with about 440,000 square feet of space combined. 

“As we look to the future, our business needs, opportunities for cost savings, and team members’ preferences about the future of work, we are excited to relocate HPE’s headquarters to the Houston region,” said Antonio Neri, CEO of HPE. “Houston is an attractive market to recruit and retain future diverse talent and where we are currently constructing a state-of-the-art new campus.  We look forward to continuing to expand our strong presence in the market.”

HPE is a global enterprise information technology company that helps customers drive digital transformation by unlocking value from all of their data. HPE delivers unique, open and intelligent technology solutions, with a consistent experience across all clouds and edges, to help customers develop new business models, engage in new ways, and increase operational performance. 

“HPE’s headquarters relocation is a signature moment for Houston, accelerating the momentum that has been building for the last few years as we position Houston as a leading digital tech hub,” said Bob Harvey, president and CEO of the Greater Houston Partnership. “Houston has long been a hub for global innovation and offers leading tech companies a deep bench of digital and corporate talent to drive success. We are excited HPE leadership recognized this, and look forward to welcoming the headquarters team to Houston.”

The addition of HPE expands Houston’s Fortune 500 headquarters roster to 23 companies. HPE is ranked No. 109 on the 2020 Fortune 500 list. 

"We are excited that Hewlett Packard Enterprise has chosen to call Texas home, and I thank them for expanding their investment in the Lone Star State by relocating their headquarters to the Houston region," said Governor Abbott. "Hewlett Packard Enterprise joins more than 50 Fortune 500 companies headquartered in the Lone Star State. Texas offers the best business climate in the nation. Our low taxes, high quality of life, top-notch workforce, and tier one universities create an environment where innovative companies like HPE can flourish. We look forward to a successful partnership with HPE, as together we build a more prosperous future for Texas." 

HPE has a long Houston pedigree, as Hewlett Packard merged with Compaq Computers in 2002. HPE was founded in 2015 following the separation from HP, Inc.

Houston has long been a global hub for innovation and offers leading tech companies a deep bench of digital and corporate talent to ensure success.

HPE's headquarters move is a testament to Houston’s unparalleled business environment and outstanding quality of life. Paired with Houston’s low cost of living – which is 25 percent below the average of the nation’s top metros – the Houston region is incredibly attractive to companies like HPE and the talent they work to recruit.

The Houston region is home to two Tier One Universities – University of Houston and Rice University – and HPE’s new campus is just an hour drive from a third Tier One university: Texas A&M University. HPE will benefit from the advanced research emerging from these universities along with the technical and corporate talent to get the job done.

Learn more about HPE as well as digital technology and innovation in Houston. 

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