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Longtime-Industry Leader, Jane Stricker joins the Partnership to lead Energy Transition Initiative 

Published Nov 11, 2021 by A.J. Mistretta

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Jane Stricker

HOUSTON (November 11, 2021) – The Greater Houston Partnership announced today that long-time energy expert Jane Stricker is joining the organization to serve in the newly created role of Executive Director of the Houston Energy Transition Initiative (HETI) and Senior Vice President, Energy Transition. In this role, Stricker will be responsible for further developing, leading, and overseeing the Partnership’s initiative to leverage Houston’s energy leadership strengths to accelerate global solutions for a low-carbon future.

Stricker will lead a coalition of industry, academic and community partners to ensure the long-term economic competitiveness and advancement of the Houston region as leaders of the global energy transition. 

“Jane is a thought leader in the energy industry who brings an extensive knowledge of the global energy ecosystem and the pathways to a low-carbon future,” said Bob Harvey, President and CEO of the Partnership. “She understands the importance of collaboration across the ecosystem to get results, and I am confident the work she will facilitate will position Houston as the global hub of the energy transition, driving our region’s long-term economic success. I’m incredibly pleased to welcome her aboard and look forward to her advancing this important effort for our community.” 

Stricker joins the Partnership after more than twenty years at bp where, among her many accomplishments, she developed and delivered the National Petroleum Council’s study on carbon capture, use and sequestration. This effort included her facilitating the collaboration of 300 participants from more than 100 organizations, including industry, academia, government and NGOs. In her most recent role as Senior Relationship Manager of Regions, Cities and Solutions, she has acted as a critical partner to cities and industry to collaborate on innovative decarbonized energy solutions, working closely with entities such as the City of Houston on their Climate Action Plan along with Greentown Labs Houston. 

“This is an exciting time for Houston and our energy ecosystem as we focus our efforts on leading the global energy transition,” said Stricker. “The challenge of our lifetime is addressing this dual challenge of meeting increased global energy demand while confronting global climate change. Houston is known for solving problems that matter. I believe through innovation, collaboration, and focus, our region can lead the way and deliver solutions that change the world.”

Stricker is a contributing faculty member of the University of Houston’s Sustainable Energy Development Program, an advisory board member of the Energy Industries Council Connect Energy USA and a graduate of the 2020 Center for Houston’s Future Leadership Forum. She received her BA in Political Science and Public Administration from the University of Maryland, Baltimore and her MBA from Loyola University in Chicago.

Stricker will start in her new position on January 1.

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Greater Houston Partnership
The Greater Houston Partnership works to make Houston one of the best places to live, work and build a business. As the principal business organization in the Houston region, the Partnership advances growth across 12 counties by bringing together business and civic-minded leaders who are dedicated to the area’s long-term success. Representing more than 900 member organizations who employ approximately one-fifth of the region’s workforce, the Partnership is the place business leaders come together to make an impact. Learn more at Houston.org.

A.J. Mistretta
Vice President, Communications         
(c) 504-450-3516 | amistretta@houston.org
 

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