Skip to main content

Report Looks at Construction Labor Gap

Published Dec 13, 2018 by A.J. Mistretta

Construction

Companies and industry groups across the country are looking at innovative ways to bring needed workers into the construction sector. 

A November 2018 report from ConstructionDive.com examined some of the methods being used to combat the labor shortage, including the efforts of UpSkill Houston. An estimated 80% of U.S. construction firms report difficultly in finding qualified hourly craft labor, according to a survey from the Associated General Contractors of America. 

Now a growing number of groups nationwide are taking active steps to educate students, teachers and parents about the value of construction careers, as well as working with legislators to get more funding to bring awareness and programs back in to schools, the report said. 

UpSkill Chair Dan Gilbane of Gilbane Building Co. told the publication that while Houston’s economy is buzzing and new jobs are being created, filling those positions with qualified talent remains a challenge. “That's not unique to just Houston or construction. It's present in all industries today. AGC's study is a great reminder we need to double down efforts to solve the technical skills gap."

Gilbane said initiatives like UpSkill provide the leadership and collaborative platform to engage policymakers, companies and potential workers to meet changing demands. 

"We have to treat workforce development as an investment in people that will ensure competitiveness of companies and the region," Gilbane told the publication.  "Providing clear career paths for people is a key part of that."

Read the full report from ConstructionDive.com.
 

Related News

Economic Development

Houston Home to 24 Fortune 500 Companies, 3rd Highest Concentration in the U.S.

6/8/21
Bolstered by the recent headquarters relocations of Hewlett Packard Enterprise and NRG Energy, Houston now has the third largest concentration of Fortune 500 companies in the nation, according to the publication’s latest report. Twenty-four companies headquartered in the Houston metro area are ranked on the 2021 Fortune 500 list. Houston is now behind only New York with 64 Fortune 500 firms and Chicago with 35. Dallas ranks fourth with 22 companies.  Houston added four companies to its Fortune 500 roster this year: Academy Sports & Outdoors, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, KBR (moved from No. 501 to No. 470), and NRG Energy. Academy Sports & Outdoors went public in October 2020 and is new to the Fortune ranking. Hewlett Packard Enterprise announced in November that it would relocate its headquarters to Houston and NRG made a similar announcement in May 2021.  Last year, there were 22 Houston area companies on the Fortune 500 list. The biggest movers from 2020 to 2021 are KBR (up to No. 470 from No. 501), Crown Castle International (up to No. 467 from No. 496), and Waste Management (up to No. 202 from No. 207).  “We often talk about Houston as America’s Headquarters City due to the large number of national and international companies that call our region home. This latest Fortune 500 list is just further evidence that Houston remains a draw for a diverse mix of companies looking for skilled corporate talent in a central geographic location with a low cost of doing business. The Houston economic development story is a strong one and we will continue to build on it via our target industries in the years to come.”  The region also had two companies come of the annual list. Apache, now known as APA, went from No. 465 to No. 595. Calpine (No. 319 in 2020) was acquired by a private consortium and is no longer publicly-traded.  The Fortune 500 list is one barometer of a region’s business activity and overall economic health. Despite the challenges posed by the pandemic over the last year, the Houston region has continued to draw new business and investment. The Partnership and its regional allies assisted in 21 economic development projects in 2020, accounting for over $704 million in capital expenditure and over 3,200 new jobs to the region.   Learn what makes Houston an attractive place for headquarters and see the full Fortune 500 list.   
Read More
Living In Houston

Massive Waterfront Development East River to Take Shape Near Downtown Houston

6/3/21
It’s not every day that a 150-acre site gets redeveloped within a stone’s throw of Downtown Houston. But that’s just what’s in store for an expansive tract hugging the north bank of Buffalo Bayou east of the Central Business District where one of the region’s largest mixed-use projects is set to rise.  East River will feature roughly 1 million square feet of commercial and residential space to be developed by Houston-based Midway in phases over the next 20 years. The first 26-acre phase breaking ground soon will include 360 apartment units, 250,000 square feet of office space and another 110,000 square feet of street-level retail. Amenities will include abundant green space, a plaza and access to hike and bike trails along the bayou.  The project’s developers and community leaders believe East River will be an economic catalyst for the previously industrial site and the East End neighborhoods that surround it. They also hope it will become a communal gathering place with special events, festivals and other activities for residents and visitors alike.  With the upper Buffalo Bayou to the west of Downtown long protected as a park, Houston has not had a sizeable commercial development along its foundational waterway. East River will directly border the bayou, drawing comparisons to other major, riverfront developments like those in New Orleans, San Antonio or New York. Meanwhile, developers are now under construction on several projects overlooking the upper bayou and its linear park, separated by Allen Parkway.  All of the projects have two things in common: mixed-use and density. Developers are looking to maximize the potential of the land along the bayou and extend the ultra-urban, pedestrian-oriented environment beyond the borders of Downtown.  Learn more about living in Houston, from neighborhoods to arts and culture.   
Read More

Related Events

Executive Partners