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Partnership Forecasts Houston will Create 71,000 Jobs in 2019

Published Dec 14, 2018 by A.J. Mistretta

HOUSTON (Dec. 14, 2018) – The Greater Houston Partnership forecasts the Houston metro area will create 71,000 net new jobs in 2019. Health care, construction and administrative services are expected to lead employment growth, though gains are anticipated in all sectors.

If the Partnership’s annual jobs forecast holds up, the region will end the year with 3.2 million payroll jobs, a net gain of more than 600,000 over the past 10 years and the fourth-largest gain of any metro in the nation.

“Houston has emerged from one of the worst energy downturns of the past 35 years where one in every four of the region’s energy jobs was lost,” said Patrick Jankowski, Senior Vice President of Research for the Partnership. “In previous downturns, such a collapse would have devastated the entire economy. This time, Houston held up quite well because our ties to the U.S. and global economies are now just as strong as our ties to oil and gas. With energy back in the black, we are poised to see growth across the spectrum.”

New jobs forecasted for 2019 by major sector:

  • Energy: 1,900
  • Health Care & Social Services: 9,000
  • Construction 8,900 Manufacturing: 6,300
  • Finance & Insurance: 1,400

Click here to see the full report, including additional jobs figures by industry. For a look back at the economy in 2018 by industry, click here for the Houston Economic Highlights report.

The mission of the Partnership is to make Houston one of the world’s best places to live, work and build a business. To that end, the Partnership provides this forecast to help the Houston business community and those involved in economic development in the region understand trends influencing the region’s economy and driving industry gains or losses. The forecast is designed to help businesses make better investment, staffing and purchase decisions in the coming year.

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